A very special spring

The snowdrops, hazelnuts and willow catkins are blooming and the days are getting longer again. It's getting warmer and the sun is showing itself again. But one after the other...

Spring in the animal world

The animal world seems to go into a state of emotional emergency every spring. Impositions, courtship rituals, dances: nothing is left out by the males to find a mate. The animals use the signals to assert themselves against the competition of rivals. The males flaunt their finery to attract the attention of females. Toads leave their wintering grounds as temperatures rise, usually piggybacking on their males and making their way to their pond spawning grounds. Birds build nests, and foxes don't take their eyes off each other until mating time.

Spring in nature

The first harbingers of spring in nature are the so-called geophytes, which usually push their leaves through the earth and bloom early in the year in gardens or deciduous forests. As early as February or March, wood anemones or liverworts take advantage of direct light and warmth above the ground. Early bloomers, such as violets, lesser celandine or cowslip, are good at protecting themselves from low temperatures or even frosts. April is also the peak blooming time for tulips and daffodils.

Spring in customs

In the pre-industrial age, without modern conveniences such as gas, electricity and supermarkets, people were much more subject to the workings of nature and the changing of the seasons than they are today. It is hard to imagine how eagerly the coming of spring was awaited. The darkness, cold and food shortages seemed almost threatening, especially towards the end of the winter months. No wonder that in a multiform tradition winter became the "bad man" who had to be driven out with joy. The symbolic farewell to the cold season is an integral part of spring customs, and the rites varied depending on the region. The awakening of spring is also associated with religious holidays such as Easter. The highest Christian festival falls every year on the Sunday after the first full moon of spring. The most important Easter custom is egg dyeing. Since eggs were considered meat during Lent, they were hard-boiled to make them last longer.

Spring at the Eulersberg

And this is it, the wonderful moment when we can welcome guests again - probably starting in May - our renovation in the foyer is completed and visitors stream onto the terrace again.

That's the way it has to be - "mia gfrein uns!" (we are looking forward to you).

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